Call for Papers

14233114_1311257028907987_1073947831870535580_n

 

************************Call for Papers********************************

The Chinese Journal of Social History of Medicine and Health is organising a special themed issue on the history of hospitals over time. The issue will be edited jointly by Professor Jonathan Reinarz (Birmingham) and Dr Fanxiang Min (Nanjing). The journal is interested in articles between 8,000-10,000 words in length. These may be sweeping surveys of particular periods (medieval, early modern, modern), or chart recent work in particular national contexts, but also map out new directions and themes in hospital history, from architecture and funding to colonial and comparative contexts. Please send one page abstracts to Jonathan Reinarz (j.reinarz@bham.ac.uk) by 30 April 2017. For a history of the Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, visit http://www.njglyy.com/en/An-Introduction/An-Introduction.asp

Call for Papers: Cultures of Harm

The History department at Birkbeck University, London, are organising a conference titled ‘Cultures of harm in institutions of care: Historical and contemporary perspectives,’ in April 2016. There is currently a call for papers, and a colleagues from the History of Hospitals Network might be interested in attending or submitting a proposal.

More details can be found here.

Conference Posters (Dubrovnik)

DubrovnikThe tenth INHH conference, which was held at Dubrovnik 10-11 April 2015, considered the impact of segregation and integration on the history of the hospital through an examination of three key themes: (1) hospital sites and spaces; (2) hospital images and representations; and (3) hospital policies.

During the conference there was a series of poster presentations based around the conference theme of segregation and integration. We then invited those presenting to send us their posters to put on our website. What follows is a number of blog posts for each poster presentation.

Presenters welcome feedback and comments – so please do get in touch! Also, please note all copyright for the posters belongs to those presenting, and posters can not be redistributed or copied without the presenter’s permission.

Integration, Segregation and the Early Modern Plague Hospital

This is the first of a ‘mini-series’ of papers on integration and segregation, leading up to the next INHH Conference on the same theme in Dubrovnik April 2015.  It is intended that these short papers will help to stimulate debate and discussion before the conference, and to spark a wider interest in hospital history. If you would like to submit your own mini-paper to be published on this site, please get in contact!

 

Stevens_Crawshaw_J_p0075724

 

Dr Jane Stevens Crawshaw (Oxford Brookes): ‘Integration, Segregation and the Early Modern Plague Hospital’.

 

Of all of the things patients might have expected to receive within an early modern plague hospital, news probably did not come high up the list.  Few institutions have been more strongly associated with segregation; many early modern writers (and modern historians) stress the social breakdown that ensued during plague epidemics in early modern Europe and have characterised plague hospitals as sites within which infection spread quickly and the sick were abandoned to their fate.

Plague Hospital

This account of the death of Doge Nicolò da Ponte in 1585 and subsequent election of Pasquale Cicogna was written on the wall of the large warehouse (the tezon grande) on the island of the lazaretto nuovo.  When the warehouse was built in 1561 it was one of the largest buildings in Venice and its purpose was to accommodate vast quantities of merchandise on the island which housed one of Venice’s two plague hospitals.

The graffiti reminds the historians of the significance of channels of commerce and communication in relation to the history of the plague hospitals.  These hospitals played a vital role in the Republic’s networks of maritime trade, public health and charitable care.  Surviving sources illustrate that Venetian Health Officers attempted to balance both integration and segregation in their administration of these hospitals in order to bring about an improvement in health across a number of different spheres, principally both medical and economic.   As a result, links between patients and their communities were not severed.  Although underplayed in literary sources, this element of the hospitals’ history is visible in archival sources as well as surviving building structures.  This example of early modern graffiti, therefore, has much to say to historians today.